Sick and Tired

Sick and Tired

“I am sick and tired of being sick and tired.” I may have said this a time or two during my career. Most of the times I said it, it was winter, and I was sick, and I was tired. These things often happen in the middle of a Michigan winter. Today, though, I want to address those of you who are sick and tired.

Let’s do things backwards – let’s address the tired first. Too many of our law enforcement people are tired. Two types of tired to talk about. The first are those that are sleepy – really sleepy. Forced overtime, family obligations, and day-to-day life can make it difficult to get the needed sleep. That comes with a cost – a big cost. Short-term lack of sleep can have similar effects on decision-making as alcohol consumption. And we know how that often turns out. If you aren’t sure, please see “Alcohol” by Brad Paisley for further study on the topic.

The second kind of tired is the long-term kind. One that could be brought on by, let’s just say, working in law enforcement over the past year and a half. The kind at wears at your very soul. This type can also cause questionable decision-making and can have other long-term effects. Like increased risks of cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. Don’t believe me? Check out this article regarding this issue.

So tired can make you sick. But we have folks out there that are sick for other reasons. COVID is still making its rounds in our law enforcement community. And heart disease. And cancer. Please get regular physicals. We are a pretty hard-headed group (hand raised high here) when it comes to doing this. You matter. Your life matters. You can’t make your life matter if you aren’t here. Make the appointment.

So, there it is. We all get sick, or tired, or sick and tired at some point. Understand it has a profound impact on your safety. Take the precautions, recognize the symptoms, and the DO something about it. Stay safe!

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